100-Day Countdown to the UN International Day of Peace

Broadcast on June 13, 2015
With Jane Goodall, Ph.D., DBE & Avon Mattison & KIRAN BALI MBE JP & Bill Yotive & Rick Ulfik & Dot Maver & Lisa Parker & Frederick Arment & Rev. Deborah Moldow

The UN has dedicated the 2015 International Day of Peace to "Partnerships for Peace -- Dignity for All." The Summer of Peace leading up to September 21st gives us the opportunity to move from concern about the great challenges facing our world to taking a stand on Peace Day as one human community united in hope. We will discuss plans at the United Nations and around the world to highlight the actions of people serving a wide range of causes yet building together a new culture of peace.

This session includes a performance of Rev. Patrick McCollum's "Peace Violin." To download a recording of the Violin at high fidelity, click here.

Jane Goodall, Ph.D., DBE

Founder, the Jane Goodall Institute and UN Messenger of Peace

In July 1960, at the age of 26, Jane Goodall, Ph.D., DBE, founder of the Jane Goodall Institute and UN Messenger of Peace, traveled from England to what is today Tanzania and bravely entered the little-known world of wild chimpanzees. She was equipped with nothing more than a notebook and a pair of binoculars. But with her unyielding patience and characteristic optimism, she won the trust of these initially shy creatures. She managed to open a window into their sometimes strange and often familiar-seeming lives. The public was fascinated and remains so to this day. Today, Jane’s work revolves around inspiring action on behalf of endangered species, particularly chimpanzees, and encouraging people to do their part to make the world a better place for people, animals, and the environment we all share. The Jane Goodall Institute works to protect the famous chimpanzees of Gombe National Park in Tanzania, but recognizes this can’t be accomplished without a comprehensive approach that addresses the needs of local people who are critical to chimpanzee survival. Our community-centered conservation programs in Africa include sustainable development projects that engage local people as true partners. These programs began around Gombe in 1994, but have since been replicated in other parts of the continent. Likewise, Jane Goodall’s Roots & Shoots, which Jane started with a group of Tanzania students in 1991, is today the Institute’s global environmental and humanitarian youth program for young people from preschool through university with nearly 150,000 members in more than 130 countries.

100 Day Countdown

Summer of Peace 2016
Broadcast on June 13, 2016
With Kimberly Mann & Jane Goodall, Ph.D., DBE & Dagmar Berkenberg & Kaja Imhof & Ambassador Mussie Hailu & Fr. James Channan & Zara Pervaiz & Maria Ying-Matthews & Sharon Yuen & Athena Wong & Angelina Gabaitse & Mpho Sebina

The UN has dedicated the 2016 International Day of Peace to “The Sustainable Development Goals–Building Blocks for Peace.” The Summer of Peace leading up to September 21 gives us the opportunity to shift from concern about the great challenges facing our nation and our world to taking a stand on Peace Day as one human community united in hope. We will discuss plans at the United Nations and hear guests around the world highlighting the actions of people serving a wide range of causes yet building together a new culture of peace. Each international guest will partner with a young person from their region, some of whom will recite a poem or play music.

Jane Goodall, Ph.D., DBE

Founder, the Jane Goodall Institute and UN Messenger of Peace

In July 1960, at the age of 26, Jane Goodall, Ph.D., DBE, founder of the Jane Goodall Institute and UN Messenger of Peace, traveled from England to what is today Tanzania and bravely entered the little-known world of wild chimpanzees. She was equipped with nothing more than a notebook and a pair of binoculars. But with her unyielding patience and characteristic optimism, she won the trust of these initially shy creatures. She managed to open a window into their sometimes strange and often familiar-seeming lives. The public was fascinated and remains so to this day. Today, Jane’s work revolves around inspiring action on behalf of endangered species, particularly chimpanzees, and encouraging people to do their part to make the world a better place for people, animals, and the environment we all share. The Jane Goodall Institute works to protect the famous chimpanzees of Gombe National Park in Tanzania, but recognizes this can’t be accomplished without a comprehensive approach that addresses the needs of local people who are critical to chimpanzee survival. Our community-centered conservation programs in Africa include sustainable development projects that engage local people as true partners. These programs began around Gombe in 1994, but have since been replicated in other parts of the continent. Likewise, Jane Goodall’s Roots & Shoots, which Jane started with a group of Tanzania students in 1991, is today the Institute’s global environmental and humanitarian youth program for young people from preschool through university with nearly 150,000 members in more than 130 countries.

11 Days of Global Unity: Environment

Broadcast on September 13, 2016
With Jane Goodall, Ph.D., DBE

Dr. Jane Goodall and Host Rick Ulfik will discuss the many connections between humans, Chimpanzees and other animals. Jane will reveal what inspires her to spend 300 days a year speaking to people and groups around the world. She invites us to look into solutions to aspects of the current Global Environmental Crisis including the importance of addressing war and famine to protect endangered wildlife because refugees are being driven into bio-diverse regions threatening their existence.

Listeners will learn about:

  • Fascinating aspects of Jane's life including her early inspirations and major life and work transition
  • The creativity, commitment and solutions that young people and others offer her
  • How the idea of "Culture" in non-human animals is becoming accepted by the scientific community
  • What WE can all do for a sustainable future

Jane Goodall, Ph.D., DBE

Founder, the Jane Goodall Institute and UN Messenger of Peace

In July 1960, at the age of 26, Jane Goodall, Ph.D., DBE, founder of the Jane Goodall Institute and UN Messenger of Peace, traveled from England to what is today Tanzania and bravely entered the little-known world of wild chimpanzees. She was equipped with nothing more than a notebook and a pair of binoculars. But with her unyielding patience and characteristic optimism, she won the trust of these initially shy creatures. She managed to open a window into their sometimes strange and often familiar-seeming lives. The public was fascinated and remains so to this day. Today, Jane’s work revolves around inspiring action on behalf of endangered species, particularly chimpanzees, and encouraging people to do their part to make the world a better place for people, animals, and the environment we all share. The Jane Goodall Institute works to protect the famous chimpanzees of Gombe National Park in Tanzania, but recognizes this can’t be accomplished without a comprehensive approach that addresses the needs of local people who are critical to chimpanzee survival. Our community-centered conservation programs in Africa include sustainable development projects that engage local people as true partners. These programs began around Gombe in 1994, but have since been replicated in other parts of the continent. Likewise, Jane Goodall’s Roots & Shoots, which Jane started with a group of Tanzania students in 1991, is today the Institute’s global environmental and humanitarian youth program for young people from preschool through university with nearly 150,000 members in more than 130 countries.