Spirituality & Peace Sunday: Living a Nonviolent Life

Broadcast on August 24, 2014
With John Dear

Based on his new book The Nonviolent Life Nobel Peace Prize nominee John Dear will reflect with us on the three attributes of wholistic nonviolence: practicing nonviolence towards one's self; practicing nonviolence to all people, all creatures, and all creation; and also, joining the global grassroots movement of nonviolence, to work for a world without war, poverty, nuclear weapons and environmental destruction, a new nonviolent world.

John Dear

Rev.
“John Dear is the embodiment of a peacemaker,” Archbishop Desmond Tutu wrote a few years ago when he nominated John for the Nobel Peace Prize. “He has led by example through his actions and in his writings and in numerous sermons, speeches and demonstrations. He believes that peace is not something static, but rather to make peace is to be engaged, mind, body and spirit. His teaching is to love yourself, to love your neighbor, your enemy, and to love the world and to understand the profound responsibility in doing all of these. He is a man who has the courage of his convictions and who speaks out and acts against war, the manufacture of weapons and any situation where a human being might be at risk through violence. For evil to prevail requires only that good people sit on the sidelines and do nothing. John Dear is compelling all of us to stand up and take responsibility for the suffering of humanity so often caused through selfishness and greed.” John Dear has spent over three decades speaking to people around the world about the Gospel of Jesus, the way of nonviolence and the call to make peace. He has served as the director of the Fellowship of Reconciliation, the largest interfaith peace organization in the United States, and after September 11, 2001, as one of the Red Cross coordinators of chaplains at the Family Assistance Center, and counseled thousands of relatives and rescue workers. He has worked in homeless shelters, soup kitchens, and community centers; traveled in warzones around the world, including Iraq, Palestine, Nicaragua, Afghanistan, and Colombia; lived in El Salvador, Guatemala and Northern Ireland; been arrested over 75 times in acts of civil disobedience against war; and spent eight months in prison for a Plowshares disarmament action. In the 1990s, he arranged for Mother Teresa to speak to various governors to stop the death penalty. He has two Master’s Degrees in Theology from the Graduate Theological Union in California, and has taught theology at Fordham University. John Dear has been featured in The New York Times, The Washington Post, USA Today, National Public Radio’s “All Things Considered” and elsewhere. He is the subject of the DVD documentary, “The Narrow Path” (with music by Joan Baez and Jackson Browne). He is profiled in John Dear On Peace, by Patti Normile (St. Anthony Messenger Press, 2009). His nearly thirty books have been translated into ten languages. John Dear is on the staff of Pace e Bene. For further information, see: www.johndear.org.

Campaign Nonviolence National Conference - Closing Panel: Going Forward to Build a New Movement of Nonviolence

Summer of Peace 2015 > Community Peacebuilding > Nonviolence
Broadcast on August 08, 2015
With John Dear & Rev. James Lawson & Kathy Kelly & Rev. Lennox Yearwood, Jr. & Medea Benjamin & Ken Butigan

In the final closing panel of the Campaign Nonviolence National Conference, Father John Dear began the discussion by explaining the three ways to practice nonviolence and how the imagination is pivotal in creating a nonviolent world. Kathy Kelly of Voices for Creative Nonviolence shared her personal reflections and some challenging questions on what the practice of nonviolence looks like in our lives. Medea Benjamin of Code Pink spoke powerfully on how the United States could use the practice of peace and nonviolence to repair our relationships around the world, and also the importance of the Iran Deal. Roshi Joan Halifax of Upaya Zen Center described the strengths and challenges of moral outrage in our practice of making change. Pace e Bene Director Ken Butigan introduced the concept of the pilgrimage to describe the journey of Campaign Nonviolence for both the movement and the participants. Rev. James Lawson finished the evening with comments on his labor organizing experiences, the importance of face-to-face, one-on-one strategies of working with one’s local community, and his personal recommendations for Campaign Nonviolence as it moves forward.

John Dear

Rev.
“John Dear is the embodiment of a peacemaker,” Archbishop Desmond Tutu wrote a few years ago when he nominated John for the Nobel Peace Prize. “He has led by example through his actions and in his writings and in numerous sermons, speeches and demonstrations. He believes that peace is not something static, but rather to make peace is to be engaged, mind, body and spirit. His teaching is to love yourself, to love your neighbor, your enemy, and to love the world and to understand the profound responsibility in doing all of these. He is a man who has the courage of his convictions and who speaks out and acts against war, the manufacture of weapons and any situation where a human being might be at risk through violence. For evil to prevail requires only that good people sit on the sidelines and do nothing. John Dear is compelling all of us to stand up and take responsibility for the suffering of humanity so often caused through selfishness and greed.” John Dear has spent over three decades speaking to people around the world about the Gospel of Jesus, the way of nonviolence and the call to make peace. He has served as the director of the Fellowship of Reconciliation, the largest interfaith peace organization in the United States, and after September 11, 2001, as one of the Red Cross coordinators of chaplains at the Family Assistance Center, and counseled thousands of relatives and rescue workers. He has worked in homeless shelters, soup kitchens, and community centers; traveled in warzones around the world, including Iraq, Palestine, Nicaragua, Afghanistan, and Colombia; lived in El Salvador, Guatemala and Northern Ireland; been arrested over 75 times in acts of civil disobedience against war; and spent eight months in prison for a Plowshares disarmament action. In the 1990s, he arranged for Mother Teresa to speak to various governors to stop the death penalty. He has two Master’s Degrees in Theology from the Graduate Theological Union in California, and has taught theology at Fordham University. John Dear has been featured in The New York Times, The Washington Post, USA Today, National Public Radio’s “All Things Considered” and elsewhere. He is the subject of the DVD documentary, “The Narrow Path” (with music by Joan Baez and Jackson Browne). He is profiled in John Dear On Peace, by Patti Normile (St. Anthony Messenger Press, 2009). His nearly thirty books have been translated into ten languages. John Dear is on the staff of Pace e Bene. For further information, see: www.johndear.org.

Campaign Nonviolence National Conference - Commemoration of the 70th anniversary of the U.S. atomic bombing of Hiroshima Ashley Pond, Los Alamos, New Mexico

Summer of Peace 2015
Broadcast on August 06, 2015
With John Dear & Roshi Joan Halifax & Rev. James Lawson

Hundreds converged at the birthplace of atomic bomb, Los Alamos, to meditate, march, and renew the commitment to peace, nonviolence, and nuclear disarmament. Father John Dear offered opening remarks and the traditional Christian sackcloth and ashes ritual of repentance from violence and nuclear weapons. A long line of marchers processed peacefully along Trinity Drive to the gates of Los Alamos National Laboratory, sitting in Buddhist meditation led by Roshi Joan Halifax of Upaya Zen Center. Upon returning to Ashley Pond, the original location of the laboratory, powerful words of wisdom were shared by Father John Dear, Ken Butigan of Pace e Bene/Campaign Nonviolence, Rev. James Lawson, and Roshi Joan Halifax. Japanese calligrapher Kazuaki Tanahashi spoke to the “workers of Los Alamos” in an impassioned plea to turn their skills to peaceful tasks. Kazuaki Tanahashi also created the giant banner that provided powerful counterpoint to the 70,000 Peace Cranes folded by groups around the world.

John Dear

Rev.
“John Dear is the embodiment of a peacemaker,” Archbishop Desmond Tutu wrote a few years ago when he nominated John for the Nobel Peace Prize. “He has led by example through his actions and in his writings and in numerous sermons, speeches and demonstrations. He believes that peace is not something static, but rather to make peace is to be engaged, mind, body and spirit. His teaching is to love yourself, to love your neighbor, your enemy, and to love the world and to understand the profound responsibility in doing all of these. He is a man who has the courage of his convictions and who speaks out and acts against war, the manufacture of weapons and any situation where a human being might be at risk through violence. For evil to prevail requires only that good people sit on the sidelines and do nothing. John Dear is compelling all of us to stand up and take responsibility for the suffering of humanity so often caused through selfishness and greed.” John Dear has spent over three decades speaking to people around the world about the Gospel of Jesus, the way of nonviolence and the call to make peace. He has served as the director of the Fellowship of Reconciliation, the largest interfaith peace organization in the United States, and after September 11, 2001, as one of the Red Cross coordinators of chaplains at the Family Assistance Center, and counseled thousands of relatives and rescue workers. He has worked in homeless shelters, soup kitchens, and community centers; traveled in warzones around the world, including Iraq, Palestine, Nicaragua, Afghanistan, and Colombia; lived in El Salvador, Guatemala and Northern Ireland; been arrested over 75 times in acts of civil disobedience against war; and spent eight months in prison for a Plowshares disarmament action. In the 1990s, he arranged for Mother Teresa to speak to various governors to stop the death penalty. He has two Master’s Degrees in Theology from the Graduate Theological Union in California, and has taught theology at Fordham University. John Dear has been featured in The New York Times, The Washington Post, USA Today, National Public Radio’s “All Things Considered” and elsewhere. He is the subject of the DVD documentary, “The Narrow Path” (with music by Joan Baez and Jackson Browne). He is profiled in John Dear On Peace, by Patti Normile (St. Anthony Messenger Press, 2009). His nearly thirty books have been translated into ten languages. John Dear is on the staff of Pace e Bene. For further information, see: www.johndear.org.

Campaign Nonviolence National Conference - Commemoration of the 70th anniversary of the U.S. atomic bombing of Hiroshima Ashley Pond, Los Alamos, New Mexico

Summer of Peace 2015 > Community Peacebuilding > Nonviolence
Broadcast on August 09, 2015
With John Dear & Rev. James Lawson & Kathy Kelly & Medea Benjamin & Beata Tsosie-Peña & Ken Butigan

Nearly three hundred citizens from across the country and local New Mexico communities gathered at the birthplace of atomic bomb, Los Alamos, to meditate, march, and renew the commitment to peace, nonviolence, and nuclear disarmament. Father John Dear led the traditional Christian sackcloth and ashes ritual of repentance from violence and nuclear weapons. The line of marchers processed along Trinity Drive with signs and banners. They sat along the busy road in silent contemplation and vigil as they demonstrated for nuclear disarmament. Then, the citizens marched back to Ashley Pond, where speakers delivered remarks underneath the swaying strings of 70,000 Cranes for Peace folded by people from around the world. Medea Benjamin of Code Pink, Kathy Kelly of Voices for Creative Nonviolence, Beata Tsosie-Peña from Santa Clara Pueblo, Ken Butigan of Pace e Bene/Campaign Nonviolence, and Rev. James Lawson.

John Dear

Rev.
“John Dear is the embodiment of a peacemaker,” Archbishop Desmond Tutu wrote a few years ago when he nominated John for the Nobel Peace Prize. “He has led by example through his actions and in his writings and in numerous sermons, speeches and demonstrations. He believes that peace is not something static, but rather to make peace is to be engaged, mind, body and spirit. His teaching is to love yourself, to love your neighbor, your enemy, and to love the world and to understand the profound responsibility in doing all of these. He is a man who has the courage of his convictions and who speaks out and acts against war, the manufacture of weapons and any situation where a human being might be at risk through violence. For evil to prevail requires only that good people sit on the sidelines and do nothing. John Dear is compelling all of us to stand up and take responsibility for the suffering of humanity so often caused through selfishness and greed.” John Dear has spent over three decades speaking to people around the world about the Gospel of Jesus, the way of nonviolence and the call to make peace. He has served as the director of the Fellowship of Reconciliation, the largest interfaith peace organization in the United States, and after September 11, 2001, as one of the Red Cross coordinators of chaplains at the Family Assistance Center, and counseled thousands of relatives and rescue workers. He has worked in homeless shelters, soup kitchens, and community centers; traveled in warzones around the world, including Iraq, Palestine, Nicaragua, Afghanistan, and Colombia; lived in El Salvador, Guatemala and Northern Ireland; been arrested over 75 times in acts of civil disobedience against war; and spent eight months in prison for a Plowshares disarmament action. In the 1990s, he arranged for Mother Teresa to speak to various governors to stop the death penalty. He has two Master’s Degrees in Theology from the Graduate Theological Union in California, and has taught theology at Fordham University. John Dear has been featured in The New York Times, The Washington Post, USA Today, National Public Radio’s “All Things Considered” and elsewhere. He is the subject of the DVD documentary, “The Narrow Path” (with music by Joan Baez and Jackson Browne). He is profiled in John Dear On Peace, by Patti Normile (St. Anthony Messenger Press, 2009). His nearly thirty books have been translated into ten languages. John Dear is on the staff of Pace e Bene. For further information, see: www.johndear.org.